Conflict

October 2005
Over the past 25 years, there have been at least 80 wars around the world. While the places may vary, today’s violent conflicts have some striking similarities: almost all are civil wars and the majority of victims are civilians, not combatants.
Most of these internal conflicts have taken place in poor countries, impeding their development. In fact, more than half the
countries where international development agencies currently operate are affected by war.
Unfortunately, the majority of these conflicts are ongoing events, not temporary emergencies.
Today’s average conflict lasts about eight years – twice as long as conflicts before 1980. And many
more people are killed in conflicts by hunger and disease than by actual fighting.

Eradicating rural poverty is one of the first steps to fighting desertification

October 2004

Land degradation – often caused by human activities such as overcultivation of soil, deforestation, overgrazing and population growth – affects more than one billion people and 40 per cent of the Earth’s
surface.When this degradation occurs in the drylands where the earth is particularly fragile, rainfall is minimal and weather is harsh, desertification results.

Desertification directly affects the lives of more than 650 million people in 110 countries. Contrary to popular belief, desertification is a process that can often be reversed.There are many ways of combating desertification, including applying appropriate land-use technologies and water-use strategies. However, one of the most effective methods of combating desertification is by eradicating poverty.

Potenciar la capacidad de acción de los pobres de las zonas rurales mediante el acceso a la tierra

June 2004
A pesar de que las personas pobres que viven en las zonas rurales son los principales productores agrícolas del mundo, en muchos casos no tienen acceso a sus tierras y no ejercen control sobre los recursos naturales de los que depende su subsistencia.
Additional languages: Portuguese, Spanish

IFAD in Turkey

May 2004

The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) supports the Turkish Government’s poverty-reduction policy, which gives priority to the development of economically depressed regions. In remote areas, particularly in mountainous regions, the lack of physical and social infrastructure, such as roads, schools and hospitals, exacerbates the isolation of rural people.

IFAD–funded projects help rural poor people overcome economic, physical, intellectual and social isolation. IFAD loans support projects that help rural poor people, particularly women, improve their living conditions and overcome poverty.

Enabling the rural poor to overcome their poverty

June 2002
IFAD is an international financial institution and a specialized United Nations agency dedicated to eradicating poverty and hunger in rural areas of developing countries.
Through low-interest loans and grants, it develops and finances programmes and projects that enable poor rural people to overcome poverty themselves.
Additional languages: English, French, Italian, Spanish

IFAD and NGOs - Dynamic partnership to fight rural poverty

May 2002
IFAD’s collaboration with NGOs began shortly after the creation of the Fund, when it supported the Small
Farmer Agricultural Credit Project in Bangladesh.
In 1976, an NGO, led by Professor Mohammed Yunus of Chattagong University, started an innovative
approach to credit delivery to the rural poor, especially to women and the landless, in a single village. The formation
and training of small groups through which loans were provided was a central feature of the initiative.
Mobile credit officers brought the service to the villagers, and effective supervision of loan recoveries ensured
repayment rates of close to 98%.