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A multifaceted field collaboration among FAO, IFAD and WFP

December 2005
FAO, IFAD and WFP are accelerating their efforts to help countries achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). More than 1 billion people live in extreme poverty, suffering hunger or undernourishment. The vast majority – about 810 million women, men and children – live in rural areas, where they depend on agriculture and related activities for their survival. The three Rome-based agencies agree that none of the Goals can be achieved unless extremely poor people, especially those living in rural areas, are supported in their struggle to emerge from poverty and hunger. Consequently, the agencies are focusing their efforts on the targets of the first Goal, to reduce by half by 2015 the proportion of people living in extreme poverty and hunger.
Additional languages: Arabic, English, Spanish, French, Italian

First mile project - factsheet 1

October 2005
Good communication is vital to small farmers who need better access to markets and to reliable information about prices, product quality and market conditions. Can new information and communication technologies (ICTs), especially the Internet, help? The First Mile is a two-year pilot project supported by the Government of Switzerland. It is implemented in collaboration with the Agricultural Marketing Systems Development Programme of the Government of the United Republic of Tanzania. Technical assistance is being provided by the International Support Group.

Conflict

October 2005
Over the past 25 years, there have been at least 80 wars around the world. While the places may vary, today’s violent conflicts have some striking similarities: almost all are civil wars and the majority of victims are civilians, not combatants. Most of these internal conflicts have taken place in poor countries, impeding their development. In fact, more than half the countries where international development agencies currently operate are affected by war. Unfortunately, the majority of these conflicts are ongoing events, not temporary emergencies. Today’s average conflict lasts about eight years – twice as long as conflicts before 1980. And many more people are killed in conflicts by hunger and disease than by actual fighting.
Additional languages: Arabic, English, Spanish, French, Italian

Annual report 2004 - part 3

June 2005
In 2004, together with its partners across the globe, IFAD continued to step up its commitment to meeting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). As the United Nations agency dedicated solely to the eradication of rural poverty, IFAD has sought during the year to bring attention to the crucial importance of agriculture and rural development to achieving the MDGs. Three-quarters of the world’s extremely poor people, about 800 million men, women and children, live in rural areas of developing countries, where they depend on agriculture and related activities for survival. While some countries are making good progress towards achieving the MDGs, most of the poorest countries are not on track to meeting the targets by 2015. Rural people make up the largest proportion of the population in most of these countries. Simply put, the MDGs will not be met unless we put agriculture and rural development at the very top of our development agenda.

Annual report 2004 - part 2

June 2005
In 2004, together with its partners across the globe, IFAD continued to step up its commitment to meeting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). As the United Nations agency dedicated solely to the eradication of rural poverty, IFAD has sought during the year to bring attention to the crucial importance of agriculture and rural development to achieving the MDGs. Three-quarters of the world’s extremely poor people, about 800 million men, women and children, live in rural areas of developing countries, where they depend on agriculture and related activities for survival. While some countries are making good progress towards achieving the MDGs, most of the poorest countries are not on track to meeting the targets by 2015. Rural people make up the largest proportion of the population in most of these countries. Simply put, the MDGs will not be met unless we put agriculture and rural development at the very top of our development agenda.

IFAD Annual Report 2004

June 2005
Learn more about IFAD’s work to promote rural transformation in our 2004 Annual Report. Discover how our investments are empowering rural women and men, and review the facts and figures we share with our Member States and partners. You can also find out more about our advocacy work on behalf of rural communities worldwide.

Annual report on investigative and anti-corruption activities 2004

May 2005
The Oversight Committee (OVC) was established by the President of IFAD in May 2000, pursuant to President’s Bulletin 2000/04, to coordinate investigations into alleged irregular practices as a means of ensuring consistent, prompt and appropriate responses to allegations. The OVC membership comprises the Vice-President of IFAD as Chair, the General Counsel and the Chief, Internal Audit.1 The Special Advisor to the Vice-President and other IFAD officers (on invitation) have also participated in OVC meetings. The mandate of the OVC was reinforced in July 2003 through the adoption of the UN/IFI Uniform Guidelines for Investigation (see President’s Bulletin 2003/06, copy attached).

Eradicating rural poverty is one of the first steps to fighting desertification

October 2004
Land degradation – often caused by human activities such as overcultivation of soil, deforestation, overgrazing and population growth – affects more than one billion people and 40 per cent of the Earth’s surface.When this degradation occurs in the drylands where the earth is particularly fragile, rainfall is minimal and weather is harsh, desertification results. Desertification directly affects the lives of more than 650 million people in 110 countries. Contrary to popular belief, desertification is a process that can often be reversed.There are many ways of combating desertification, including applying appropriate land-use technologies and water-use strategies. However, one of the most effective methods of combating desertification is by eradicating poverty.

Annual Report 2003

June 2004
Learn more about IFAD’s work to promote rural transformation in our 2003 Annual Report. Discover how our investments are empowering rural women and men, and review the facts and figures we share with our Member States and partners. You can also find out more about our advocacy work on behalf of rural communities worldwide.

Potenciar la capacidad de acción de los pobres de las zonas rurales mediante el acceso a la tierra

June 2004
A pesar de que las personas pobres que viven en las zonas rurales son los principales productores agrícolas del mundo, en muchos casos no tienen acceso a sus tierras y no ejercen control sobre los recursos naturales de los que depende su subsistencia.
Additional languages: Spanish, Portuguese

Annual report 2003 - part 2

June 2004
In 2003, IFAD celebrated its 25th anniversary. The Governing Council and other events during the year highlighted IFAD’s growth over the past quarter century into a mature development institution focused on eradicating rural poverty. The timely and successful completion of the Sixth Replenishment at the 2003 Council underlined the commitment of Member States to IFAD’s mission. The Governing Council also agreed to initiatives to strengthen the institution in the coming years.

Annual report 2003 - part 3

June 2004
IFAD’s current investment policy was adopted in December 2001. The policy allocates five per cent of investments in cash, 44 per cent in government bonds, 23 per cent in diversified fixed-interest instruments, 18 per cent in inflation-indexed bonds and ten per cent in equities. These allocations were implemented with the exception of the asset class for inflation-indexed bonds until June 2003, when two such investments were made, bringing the class to some ten per cent of the overall portfolio. The remaining unfunded amount was held in the government bonds portfolio and, to a lesser extent, in the internally managed portfolio.

IFAD in Turkey

May 2004
The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) supports the Turkish Government’s poverty-reduction policy, which gives priority to the development of economically depressed regions. In remote areas, particularly in mountainous regions, the lack of physical and social infrastructure, such as roads, schools and hospitals, exacerbates the isolation of rural people. IFAD–funded projects help rural poor people overcome economic, physical, intellectual and social isolation. IFAD loans support projects that help rural poor people, particularly women, improve their living conditions and overcome poverty.

IFAD annual report 2002 - part 3

February 2003
The Fund’s ongoing change process aims to strengthen teamwork, management capabilities and accountability while ensuring alignment with its corporate strategy and objectives. In 2002 the Fund adjusted its structure to create a more focused and consolidated organization – one that delivers positive change in the context of the strategic framework. The Offices of the President and Vice-President were integrated so as to consistently function as a team. The Office of the Vice-President is charged with cross-departmental responsibilities, thus enabling this office to better assist the President on a wide range of business and management issues. This, in turn, has enabled the President to increase leadership and management capacity, which allows for greater flexibility in addressing key internal and external needs and, at the same time, provides greater scope for staff communication and interaction. Crossdepartmental responsibilities have also enabled the Vice-President to concentrate more on implementation and follow-up. In addition, a Finance and Administration Department has been created and consists of the Offices of the Controller, Treasurer and Human Resources, the Management Information Systems Division, and Administrative Services. The new External Affairs Department consolidates the main externally oriented functions – Communications Division, Office of the Secretary, Resource Mobilization, and Policy Division – into one department. Communications includes publications, web coordination and media. The Protocol function, which was previously under Administrative Services, has moved to the Office of the Secretary. The Programme Management Department remains unchanged. The chart below illustrates the new organizational structure.

IFAD annual report 2002 - part 2

February 2003
Strengthening the capacity of the rural poor and their organizations is a central element in all projects approved in 2002 for the region. The Cameroon Community Development Support Project, for example, will help develop the social capital of the rural poor in an area covering both the forest and Sahelian zones of the country. This will be done through support to grass-roots organizations and local development institutions, promotion of functional literacy, and establishment of participatory planning processes for local development, in which traditionally marginalized groups can have an effective voice. The Niger Project for the Promotion of Local Initiative for Development in Aguié, which is a second-phase operation, seeks to consolidate innovative first phase accomplishments by further strengthening consultation and decentralized decision-making processes between rural communities and public and private service providers.

IFAD Annual Report 2002

February 2003
Learn more about IFAD’s work to promote rural transformation in our 2002 Annual Report. Discover how our investments are empowering rural women and men, and review the facts and figures we share with our Member States and partners. You can also find out more about our advocacy work on behalf of rural communities worldwide.

The rural poor - Survival or a better life?

September 2002
This paper outlines the social and environmental reasons why the international development community should give higher priority to helping poor people, especially those in areas that are biophysically marginal or socio-economically marginalized. Sustainable rural development depends on successfully addressing the twin challenges of poverty and environmental degradation. There are 1.2 billion people living in extreme poverty, and of these, 900 million live in rural areas where they depend directly or indirectly on agriculture to survive. The paper gives a brief overview of rural development in the context of the Millennium Development Goals and AGENDA 21, which call for concerted action to address the problems of the rural poor and the limitations of their natural resource base.

Enabling the rural poor to overcome their poverty

June 2002
IFAD is an international financial institution and a specialized United Nations agency dedicated to eradicating poverty and hunger in rural areas of developing countries. Through low-interest loans and grants, it develops and finances programmes and projects that enable poor rural people to overcome poverty themselves.
Additional languages: English, Spanish, French, Italian

IFAD and NGOs - Dynamic partnership to fight rural poverty

May 2002
IFAD’s collaboration with NGOs began shortly after the creation of the Fund, when it supported the Small Farmer Agricultural Credit Project in Bangladesh. In 1976, an NGO, led by Professor Mohammed Yunus of Chattagong University, started an innovative approach to credit delivery to the rural poor, especially to women and the landless, in a single village. The formation and training of small groups through which loans were provided was a central feature of the initiative. Mobile credit officers brought the service to the villagers, and effective supervision of loan recoveries ensured repayment rates of close to 98%.

IFAD Annual Report 2001

May 2002
Learn more about IFAD’s work to promote rural transformation in our 2001 Annual Report. Discover how our investments are empowering rural women and men, and review the facts and figures we share with our Member States and partners. You can also find out more about our advocacy work on behalf of rural communities worldwide.

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