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The Mitigation Advantage: Maximizing the co-benefits of investing in smallholder adaptation initiatives

October 2015
The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has highlighted a critical trade-off between agricultural development and climate change mitigation.

Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Programme (ASAP) brochure

October 2015
The Adaptation for Smallholder Agriculture Programme (ASAP) was launched by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) in 2012 to make climate and environmental finance work for smallholder farmers. A multi-year and multi-donor financing window, ASAP provides a new source of cofinancing to scale up and integrate climate change adaptation across IFAD’s approximately US$1billion per year of new investments. The programme is joined up with IFAD’s regular investment processes and benefits from rigorous quality control and supervision systems. ASAP is driving a major scaling up of successful ‘multiple-benefit’ approaches to smallholder agriculture, which improve production while reducing and diversifying climate-related risks. In doing so, ASAP is blending tried-and tested approaches to rural development with relevant adaptation know-how and technologies. This will increase the capacity of at least 8 million smallholder farmers to expand their livelihood options in an uncertain and rapidly changing environment.
Additional languages: Arabic, English, Spanish, French, Russian

Finance for Food: Investing in Agriculture for a Sustainable Future

October 2015
Agriculture and food are critical areas in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development – a global action plan aiming to guide the actions of governments, the private sector and a range of other stakeholders over the next fifteen years. The agrifood sector is a key area of investment for food security and nutrition.

IFAD Policy brief 2: An empowerment agenda for rural livelihoods

October 2015
This policy brief argues that the post-2015 development agenda should be designed to encourage governments and other actors to facilitate the economic and social empowerment of the poor rural people, in particular, marginalized rural groups such as women and indigenous peoples.

The use of remittances and financial inclusion

September 2015
The Use of Remittances and Financial Inclusion A report prepared by the International Fund for Agricultural Development and the World Bank Group to the G20 Global Partnership for Financial Inclusion.

Zipping up the Evidence - Dealing with non-counterfactuals in Viet Nam and Ghana

September 2015
Participatory Impact Assessment and Learning Approach (PIALA)

Proceedings of the 2nd Global Meeting of the Indigenous Peoples Forum at IFAD, 12-13 February 2015

September 2015
Proceedings of the 2nd Global Meeting of the Indigenous Peoples Forum at IFAD, 12-13 February 2015

Case study: Family life model, Uganda

September 2015
This case study illustrates how the Family Life Model (household methodology) has been used effectively in Uganda, highlighting how it has worked in a particular context.

An Innovative, Scalable, Pro-poor Home Cooking-based Charcoal Production Value Chain For Women

September 2015
With a small grant, INBAR has innovated Household Charcoal (HHC) production from cooking with firewood into a new livelihood opportunity and sustainable value chain for the economic empowerment of poor rural women. Women from poor rural households in Ethiopia, India and Tanzania were trained to put out fires when they had finished cooking to prevent smouldering, collect household charcoal through the clusters and process it into briquettes. INBAR has also developed the NCPP Social Enterprise Model which is an Innovative & Inclusive Institutional system to strengthen the rural development ecosystem and enable safe investment opportunities for rural women.

How to do note: Household Methodologies

September 2015
This How To Do Note provides a step-by-step guide on how to implement Household Methodologies (HHMs). It describes activities at the household level, different approaches for implementing HHMs, service providers and the facilitator system, and the role of the community and the wider environment. The main points to consider when incorporating HHMs in project design and implementation are noted.

How to do note: Climate change risk assessments in value chain projects

September 2015
This HTDN is directed primarily at the design phase of IFAD value chain projects, though it does have some relevance for both pre-design and implementation phases.

GEF Mexico factsheet

September 2015
The project objective is to strengthen sustainable forest management in the project area and develop local capabilities, leading to the reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation and the increase of carbon sequestration through the financing of initiatives for the most vulnerable. Project operations are focused in 25 municipalities, in which 83 per cent of the population are indigenous peoples.

GEF Senegal factsheet

September 2015
The project interventions focus on water resources management through three main components: i) capacity building, awareness raising and knowledge management at the national level, ii) water harvesting and watershed management, and iii) water conservation and efficient irrigation.

Climate Change Adaptation Project in the Areas of Watershed Management and Water Retention

September 2015
The project interventions focus on water resources management through three main components: i) capacity building, awareness raising and knowledge management at the national level, ii) water harvesting and watershed management, and iii) water conservation and efficient irrigation.

Ecuador - Sustainable Management of Biodiversity and Water Resources in the Ibarra-San Lorenzo Corridor

September 2015
Over the last decade, Ecuador’s poverty levels have fallen despite a period of recent political and economic crises. Nevertheless, in rural spheres, indigenous and Afro-Ecuadorian communities continue to face barriers to economic inclusion, ranging from lack of secure access to land and water resources to limited investment opportunities. The situation varies across regions and social groups. In the Amazon for instance, indigenous groups struggle to obtain clear titles for communal lands that are under increased pressure from oil exploration and production. In the highlands, peasant communities face shortages of land and increasing degradation due to agricultural intensification and unregulated expansion into the upper reaches of water basins (páramos). In the coastal regions, communities face growing encroachment on their lands by large landholdings, in addition to degradation of mangrove forests due to unsustainable exploitation.

ASAP Burundi factsheet

September 2015
Project activity has been classified into separate components, however they all come together to deliver the same overall objective. One component revolves around sustainable growth and capacity building. It will focus efforts on things such as improvements to infrastructure and hydro agriculture; developing wetlands and watershed areas.

ASAP Uganda factsheet

September 2015
The project work will be split into two components. The first will deal with Rural Livelihoods and the second with Market Linkages and Climate Resilient Infrastructure. PRELNOR will enable smallholder farmers to improve their productivity to a level where there is enough surplus production that the farmer can sell at market.

How To Do Note: Measuring Climate Resilience

September 2015
This How To Do Note is intended as a tool for IFAD staff and partners involved in investment projects with climate resilience objectives.

African Conference on Remittances and Postal Networks – official report

September 2015
This report proceeds from the First African Conference on Remittances and Postal Networks held in Cape Town, South Africa 2015.

Investing in rural people in Colombia

September 2015
Since the 1990s, Colombia has experienced sustained, strong economic growth. However, it is one of the most unequal countries in the world. The gap between urban and rural areas is particularly wide. While the incidence of poverty is 27.8 per cent of the population at the national level, 40.3 per cent of rural people live in poverty. The percentage is even higher among indigenous peoples and communities of African descent. The agricultural sector represents 6.1 per cent of Colombia’s GDP and 16.3 per cent of employment. However, these figures could be even higher because the country has huge agricultural potential.

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Communities Intro

Communities of Practice (CoPs) and networks are important ways to develop, capture, curate and share knowledge, especially by building on the collective knowledge of members. 

IFAD supports a growing number of communities and networks. You are welcome to join any of them and contribute your ideas, experience and content, as well as take part in on-line discussions.