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Investing in rural people in the Kingdom of Morocco

novembre 2016
Since 1979, IFAD has financed 14 rural development projects for a total of US$268.6 million.

Enabling poor rural people to overcome poverty in Mauritius

février 2013
IFAD and the Government of Mauritius are moving towards a new form of partnership that differs from the standard model for low-income countries, which was followed in Mauritius until 2005. IFAD recognizes that the country now has sufficient national resources to address rural poverty, so the focus of interventions has shifted from financing projects towards developing a collaborative approach with the government to reduce the incidence of poverty. This approach includes policy dialogue, knowledge management and sharing, and partnership-building.

Investing in rural people in Ghana

mars 2015
Ghana has the third largest IFAD country programme in the West and Central Africa region. The programme contributes to building inclusive and sustainable institutions, backed by pro-poor investments and policies as well as relevant innovation and learning. IFAD supports the main thrusts of the government’s Ghana Shared Growth and Development Agenda – including accelerated agricultural modernization, sustainable natural resource management and enhanced private-sector competitiveness. Its work also aligns with Ghana’s Medium Term Agriculture Sector Investment Plan on food security, income growth and other programme areas related to rural poverty reduction.

Enabling poor rural people to overcome poverty in Lesotho

mai 2008
The main objectives of IFAD’s operations in the country are to improve food security and family nutrition. Since 1980, IFAD has supported agricultural development by investing a total of US$64.3 million in seven programmes and projects to reduce poverty in the country’s rural areas. Normally, Lesotho is not in a position to grow enough food to feed its growing population. Offsetting the effects on poor households of declining agricultural production, IFAD investments support the efforts of small-scale farmers to ensure food security for their families and improve their incomes. Increased productivity is a key to achieving these aims and to reducing poverty in rural areas. IFAD finances programmes and projects that encourage poor people’s participation in the planning and development of income-generating activities, including microenterprises.

Investing in rural people in El Salvador

novembre 2015
IFAD has acquired considerable experience during its three decades of partnership with the country. It has contributed directly and indirectly to the mobilization of resources aimed at removing structural obstacles to the development of rural poor people. This has been achieved through the active involvement of, and coordination with, family farmers, indigenous peoples, rural youth organizations, government, international cooperation agencies, civil society and, more recently, the private sector. IFAD-funded projects mainly support family farmers and entrepreneurs in municipalities in which poverty is prevalent. Activities have also helped to address needs arising after the end of the 12-year internal armed conflict and the 2001 post-earthquake reconstruction process.

Avantage de l’atténuation: Maximiser les avantages connexes d’investir dans des initiatives d’adaptation des petits exploitants agricoles

octobre 2015
Le Groupe intergouvernemental sur l’évolution du climat (GIEC) a soulevé un dilemme difficile entre développement agricole et atténuation des changements climatiques.

Youth: Investing in young rural people for sustainable and equitable development

octobre 2014
Young people are the future. But all too often in today’s world young women and men are marginalized and excluded – from decent employment and from crucial decisions about how to address the big challenges that face us all. Their voices are rarely heard in democratic debate and their needs and views are rarely reflected in policies and programmes. Yet more than ever the world needs young people’s ideas, their talents and their energy. In rural areas, we particularly need their drive and innovative skills to sustainably produce the food required by an increasingly populous and urbanized world.