Recipes for Change: Poulet Yassa

There are many varieties of onions grown in Senegal. Perhaps the most common are the Gandiol and Noflaye species which are both well known for their strong taste and ability to be stored for long periods of time. The onion is a dietary staple of Senegal, appearing in many of the country's most famous dishes, including Poulet Yassa.
Climate change is contributing to rising sea levels, increased levels of salt in agricultural land, erratic rainfall and weather patterns which is affecting the productive lands of Senegal. Poor rural farmers are finding it increasingly difficult to farm what has until this point been staples of the local diet such as rice and onions. 
IFAD is working hard to help Senegalese farmers adapt to these climatic effects through many different methods such as soil washing and dyke building. Hopefully with the right intervention, Poulet Yassa will remain on the menu!
Why not give it a go and cook this traditional Senegalese recipe? It is a mixture of Onions, chicken, lemon and spices. It is usually served on a bed of rice.

Try the recipe at home: Senegalese Poulet Yassa recipe
Serves 6

Nutritional Facts for 150g serving:
Calories: 670. Fat: 49g. Carbs: 16g. Protein: 40g

Ingredients:

  • Freshly squeezed juice from 3 or 4 lemons
  • 4 large onions sliced thinly
  • Salt & pepper
  • 1-3 chopped hot chillies
  • 75 ml tablespoon peanut oil
  • One 1.6 kg whole chicken (gizzard removed), cut into serving pieces
  • 4 carrots, trimmed and cut crosswise into thin "> 120 ml water

Cooking instructions
Combine all the ingredients except for the oil in a large bowl and mix. Refrigerate and leave for a minimum of 4 hours (for best results leave overnight)

  • Remove the chicken pieces, pat dry, and grill, sauté them until well browned.
  • Heat the oil over a medium flame. Remove the onions from the marinade and cook for 10 mins.
  • Add the chicken and the rest of the marinade to the onion pot and cook on a low heat until onions are wilted.

Serving suggestions
Add Salt and pepper to taste and serve on a bed of white rice. Alternately you can break from tradition and serve on a bed of roasted cauliflower.

Climate Risks:

  •  Rising sea levels
  • Increased levels of salt in agricultural land
  • Erratic rainfall and weather patterns.

IFAD solutions

  •  IFAD helps comslices
  • 15 ml Dijon-style mustard
  •  
  • <li style="outline: 0px; font-size: 11.5200004577637px;munities adapt to climate change with techniques such as soil washing and dyke building.
  • It also helps farmers gain easier access to markets and obtain a fairer distribution of profits.