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Partnering with civil society

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Working with civil society organizations and NGOs is key to IFAD’s work to reduce global poverty.

We partner with NGOs in a number of ways. At the local level, projects and programmes supported by IFAD often leverage the experience of NGOs and their local knowledge for project implementation. Local NGOs are often able to reach segments of rural populations that government agencies neglect or do not target as a priority.

IFAD also supports NGOs on regional and global advocacy and research initiatives and aims to provide civil society partners with a platform to advocate for poor rural people.

Some examples of IFAD's partnerships with NGOs include working with:

Spotlight

From unemployed to entrepreneur: helping Arab youth in rural areas take control of their futures

In the Near East and North Africa region, seventeen million young people – more than 20 per cent of the population – are without work. This rate is higher than any other region in the world.

Related news

Nutrition for girls: Save the Children / IFAD, integrated and multi-sectoral measures to save adolescent girls from malnutrition and prevent early deaths

October 2018 - NEWS

Opens today in Rome the International Conference "Leaving no one behind - making the case for adolescent girls," organized by IFAD, Save the Children, with support of the Canadian Government.

Heifer International and UN’s IFAD strengthen partnership to build resilience of rural people

September 2017 - NEWS
Heifer International and the International Fund for Agriculture Development (IFAD) have agreed to seek opportunities to collaborate on market-driven development, climate-smart agriculture, access to finance and several other areas involving smallholder farmers.

Related publications

IFAD and NGOs - Dynamic partnership to fight rural poverty

May 2002
IFAD’s collaboration with NGOs began shortly after the creation of the Fund, when it supported the Small
Farmer Agricultural Credit Project in Bangladesh.
In 1976, an NGO, led by Professor Mohammed Yunus of Chattagong University, started an innovative
approach to credit delivery to the rural poor, especially to women and the landless, in a single village. The formation
and training of small groups through which loans were provided was a central feature of the initiative.
Mobile credit officers brought the service to the villagers, and effective supervision of loan recoveries ensured
repayment rates of close to 98%.